Sunday 12 May 2024

No money, no Swiss! The hills are alive!

The Zinnfiguren madness continues, this time with the ferocious mercenaries of the Swiss Cantons; the title of this post (at least the first part) refers to their reputation for what would now be called "collective bargaining", threatening to go on strike just before a battle, unless paid....

It took a while to find "Swiss" figures that were different from Landesknecht until I read Embleton's comments that the Swiss were slightly more restrained but with a penchant for Ostrich feathers....

I picked "aggressive" figures:











The native French pike were also completed:


I have also idly been thinking about terrain. I dug out some plywood boards I had covered in Heki grass flock paper many moons ago for DBA and small games, although the raw material exists to expand these boards. These are the second incarnation of such boards, originally a Terry Wise idea; the first attempts were left in Newcastle at the Tyneside Wargames club.

I had made some hills for the new boards, based on sizes and types in WRG's 1685 - 1845 rules. However while browsing eBay, I found someone selling some grass flocked hills in different sizes. They are polystyrene on wood and the flock matches the board rather well. More than enough by way of hills.....




14 comments:

  1. Very nice indeed! The Swiss and the French pikemen look great, really top notch work on them. I must admit I like those hills, they look very handy.

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  2. Thanks Donnie. I've stalled a bit now as I'm waiting for some more potential Swiss pike. Still plenty to paint, but need to think about what to do next.
    The hills are surprisingly light; I thought they would be S&S ones, but I think they are home made. More than enough for my needs.
    Neil

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  3. Figure poses are imaginatively dynamic with a great sense of motion. You bring them to life with your painting. The figures look fragile. How will they hold up to the rigors of ham-fisted gamers? Very nice hills!

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  4. Jonathan, they are probably no more fragile than the average metal wargames figure, probably less than hard plastic. The spears tend to bend when caught. There are weak spots much like slender swords and bayonets on white metal figures, but even ankles tend to bend a lot before any breakages.
    I doubt anyone but me will be playing with them!
    Neil

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  5. Lively looking poses and very nice all painted up.

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  6. Every time I see these I like them more and more. 😀

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  7. Thanks Stew. Clearly flats are the future! ☺
    Neil

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  8. Flats are enticing. You're making a wonderful progress on these.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Joe. They are horribly addictive!
      I'm trying to resist other periods and failing miserably!
      There's something captivating about the animation.
      Neil

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  9. Not madness at all, but rather wonderful! Amazing to learn they had ostrich farms in 16th-Century Switzerland :)
    Hills look nice - and Swiss will be at home on them..

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  10. Thanks David. I do wonder about the necessary trade route that enabled that supply....☺
    Neil

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  11. Terrific looking Swiss Neil…
    Lovely dynamic figures.

    All the best. Aly

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Aly. A few more to do.......and some Landesknechts.
      Neil

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Another week passes.....

I'm conscious I have not posted since 1 June, but truth be told I have little new to post by way of painted figures or similar.... So, w...